Why testing is like curling!

I was watching the Winter Olympics with curiousity – there are some amazing athletes and some amazing sports.

One among them was curling.

I didn’t get it.

The game reminds me of lawn bowls on ice except that the crowd went nuts!

So with this in mind, the analogy and test management came to mind. I had a discussion in a test management class and we came to similar conclussions.

Curling is a team game with 4 people with 2x team members called “sweepers” clearing the path so that the “stone” has a smooth journey to the “house” ( the bullseye.)

My question then is, how much of testing is like this?

How much time as testers/leads/managers do we spend on smoothing the path for testing?

Teamwork – The value of a good team

How a good test team can help you become a better tester!

Teamwork

 

 

 

I’ve been watching New Zealand’s Junior Tall Blacks play at the U19 FIBA World Championships (Auckland New Zealand) and what struck me the most was the level of teamwork showed by the team. This was one of the contributing factors behind the team doing so well – i mean undersized, under gunned but plenty of heart, a good coach, sound systems AND generally good teamwork. What it did lack was the experience. Even though this was the U19’s, a number of teams had professional basket ballers in their team and that experience help decide close games.

When i think back to software testing teams i have been on i immediately think about the varying degrees of teamwork. I’ve worked on a team that was very hierarchical, there was a definitive pecking order and if you upset the head honcho (or in this case, honcho-ess), you quickly became ostracised. And this was regardless of skill, knowledge or enthusiasm and when you were out, you were out. This meant that the peripheral testing activities became harder to accomplish until you got back “in”. You had no or little peer support and pleas (subtle or otherwise) to management were fruitless. It didn’t bother me too much  because (either i was naive or ignorant) but one tester i saw felt this ‘pressure’ and it affected her ability to test. Why? Because she was too busy dealing and thinking about her social status that she couldn’t concentrate on testing (AND I mean thoughtful, critical testing.)

I’ve also worked as a sole tester in which, generally speaking, i never had to contend with team politics. I guess i was seen more as a project peer, an individual and not some annoymous member of an annoymous team. I was real and approachable and i guess this made it easier to build a rapport with. This is my experience but obviously it may not be typical. We have ‘control’ over ourselves but not much so over our environments.

I have also been part of a team that was supportive and encouraging and in essence allowed individuals to experiment, to try different things, expand and explore. And because these positive team attributes were in place, the opportunity to collaborate, share and test greatly increased. Whereas in the hierachial team i was in, knowledge was gold and he/she who had the most gold won, the supportive team wasn’t worried about which individual had the most gold but how much gold the team had collectively. Testing thrived because it was allowed to!

I have felt the value of a good teamwork. It goes along way to helping you get up in the morning and enjoying your day rather than dreading it.Testing is a human approach and its not just our interaction with the software but also with those we work with that helps us become better testers!

Test Strategy vs. Test Plan

sun_tzu.jpgRecently i have posted a couple of replys on the Microsoft Software Test forum – http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/testing/default.aspx – click the link entitled Software Testing Discussion Forum.

There are a couple of posts on Test Strategy and Test Plans and what they are. Quite often the two terms are interchangeable and used indiscriminately. A Test Strategy (according to ISTQB) is the document that describes the methods of testing or the how. Whether this document is pitched at an enterprise level or a project level is open to discussion but essentially the Strategy is projecting ideas over a longer period of time.

The Oxford Dictionary defines Strategy as “… a plan designed to achieve a particular long-term aim” and as such looks at the ‘bigger’ picture.

A Test Plan describes the ‘How’ at a lower level. IEEE 829 (on which there is much debate on the revision currently being voted on) introduces the structure of should be incorporated in the plan. It is comparable to tactics which again according the Oxford Dictionary is “…an action or strategy planned to achieve a specific end.”

Whether you use either or both terms or documents is up to you. As testers we sometimes become involved in paper wars and become document heavy at the expense of efficiency and effectiveness. Whatever process you follow the key for any test document is effective communication.

Bj Rollison – a Test Architect at Microsoft (http://blogs.msdn.com/imtesty/about.aspx) sums up what happens if we stop thinking about how and what we use these documents for…”The only testers who stop thinking critically about tools and the application of tools we can use in the appropriate context are testers who have a limited understanding of the overall responsibility of testing, and know even less about the tools they are tyring to use.”

Great quote – i totally agree. Whether its a Test Strategy or Test Plan, it is a tool whose purpose is to serve us and guide us in our testing activities.

If you are responsible for producing said documents, please be critcial in your thinking and look at the best way to communicate to all those involved in your sphere!

The 2006 NBA season the Phoenix Suns Strategy vs. the LA Lakers was “…Phoenix’s strategy against the Lakers this season has been to contain everyone besides Kobe Bryant, and it’s worked. Bryant had 39 points in the first meeting and 37 in the second, but no other Lakers player scored more than 17 in the two games and the Suns simply outscored Los Angeles, averaging 114 points.” – Yahoo Sports.

There is your Strategy, the plan is how each Sun player played defense against their man.

Strategy without tactics is the slowest route to victory. Tactics without strategy is the noise before defeat.– Sun Tzu