Weeknight Testing #04 – an experience report


I had the privilege of joining Weeknight testing (Twitter #WNTesting). This was my first session as I am generally not available for weekend testing sessions (By the way, WTANZ session #12 is on this weekend).

Ok – so what happened during the Weeknight testing session?

I was about 5-10 minutes late waiting for my laptop to boot up etc and when I did login,  there was a flurry of chatter (what I mean by this is that a testing session is held via im over Skype).

Darren McMillan was the facilitator who had the challenging of keeping up with the threads and multiple chats while at the same time guidiong direction in a subtle way (mainly by quoting interesting comments).

I found the *noise* challenging that I went *dark* (to steal a Tony Bruce phrase :)) for a while or in other words I didn’t contribute to the discussion(s) until i had read the mission, requirements document and getting used to the rhythm of the session. I found that while the first two are important, the rhythm is vital as it means that I was able to respond to questions or threads in *real-time* once i had the rhythm ofthe conversation(s).

So – what was it all about?

The mission was to *test* a set of requirements for a fictional company called CRM-R-US by “…reviewing and feeding back on the initial requirements to help identify any gaps, risks or potential issues in them.” This document is at an early stage of requirements gathering and was a first draft. The product is marketing tool centered around twitter.

Some of the participants mentioned they were off mind mapping so I followed suit – except I hand drew mine. I identified four major sections in the document but focused initially on one – the section on the Campaign Engine.

The main reason was threefold:

  1. The lack of *detail*
  2. The section was based on a vision and
  3. A comment stating… ‘Our CEO Patricia Elmer’s liked Brian’s idea so much she’s now seeing this as the key selling point of this feature.’. The CEO is someone who matters and has major influence and power and almost by default, the section to me, had high risk.

So, I began to ask some questions – a few at first and then once I got the rhythm, a lot more. By that time there was 40 minutes to go and questions and comments were coming thick and fast – there was a great question from Sharath B – What’s in it for me if I follow? This made me pause as I was thinking from a business user/call centre point of view whereas Sharath’s question made me think along the lines of the target audience and why would they want to follow our fictional company in twitter. For me, Sharath’s question made look at the broader picture and defocus my thinking. From a testing point of view, using a defocusing strategy helps look at the problem from a broader point of view. This was one of many fantastic ideas, thoughts and questions – the transcript will be posted soon (http://weekendtesting.com/archives/tag/weeknight-testing) – from which you can see some of the great thoughts and ideas that went on during the session.

Lessons Learned for me…

  • Sometimes pairing *may not* be the best option – some great pairs of testers working on a mind map tool weren’t able to pair as effectively as they might well have liked.
  • Tour the product
  • Ask ‘What is NOT being said’
  • Alert – if potential some bodies who matter (e.g. CEO) are mentioned throughout the document, flag it as a potential risk as they have influence/power/authority
  • Mind mapping is a good idea generator and framing tool – see the mind map – from Lisa Crispin and Mohinder Khosla and the mind map from Rakesh Reddy who were both involved in this session.
  • Focusing AND defocusing strategies work well together (focusing on a section to get specific, defocusing by looking at the bigger picture.)

These are some of the thoughts running through my head – I was able to connect with some really good thinking testers which in turn has helped me alot – all in the space of an hour or so!

If you haven’t tried weekend or weeknight testing, give it a go – it is a worthwhile investment!

Advertisements

Author: bjosman

Principal Consultant at OsmanIT brian.osman@osmanit.com

4 thoughts on “Weeknight Testing #04 – an experience report”

  1. Hi Brian,

    It was fantastic fun for me facilitating this session, planning in lot and lots of traps 🙂

    I think most traps got uncovered, but a few were still un-found.

    Next step for CRM-R-US will be taking the challenge to my team, who’ll be doing it sometime next week. So that should also be an eye opener.

    I’m glad you could make it and thanks for sharing the excellent write up. I find pairing a hit and miss also, sometimes it’s easier to go solo as remote pairing is a skill to master in itself.

    Cheers,

    Darren.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s