Testing the Mindset

tao_yinyangearth2.jpgI recently read an interesting blog entitled ‘How can i become a better Tester’ – http://thoughtsonqa.blogspot.com/2007/12/how-can-i-become-better-tester.html

This was my comment i left… 

Hi John,

Enjoyed your article. I agree – its mindset (quality), its information gathering (read, read and more reading….asking questions…be involved)and finding that mentor who you can clicked with. Sometimes, when as a new tester, we can be blinded by the bias of that mentor so i would add – ‘When you are ‘ready’ question yourself, your understanding, your toolbox and then define yourself in the testing space’ – the trick is knowing when you are ready!
When i first started testing i was sure that testing was <b>ALL</b> about test scripts, test documents, writing documents and more documents because that’s how it was. Today, my thoughts and process have changed dramtically compared to when i first started testing but those earlier experiences shaped my thought processes today!
Great blog John!

Which got me thinking – how do our experiences shape our thought processes and ‘steer’ us towards one method or another? For me embracing a more Exploratory approach was a logical evolution in the testing space. It allowed me to be creative yet structured at the sametime – it increased my toolbox – and i gain immense satisfaction from this approach to testing. Why? Because when i was involved in the more traditional form of testing, i got to the point that i wondered what is the point to what i am doing….in other words i began to question myself and re-examined the ‘tools’ i had. That’s when i became open to different methods to testing.

If i wasn’t as receptive or i wasn’t at that questioning stage, i doubt that Exploratory testing would’ve taken off for me as it has!

So sometimes, it comes down to timing as well as being open to new ideas!

Teamwork

teamwork-skydivers-ii-print-c10007532.jpgI was reading a book from master coach Pat Riley entitled The Winner Within. This book has been around for a number of years (1993) and Coach Riley discuss his philosophies that make up a successful team. Coach Riley knows what he’s talking about – he’s was at the helm of the 1980’s LA Lakers World Championship basketball teams, the New York Knicks and the 2006 Miami Heat championship team.

Most of us belong to some sort of team. And while we may not always get on with others, we are some what reliant on others doing their job, playing their role. Its no different from testing. Whilst we may be perceived as being negative (‘Your job is to break the system’), we still play a vital part. If we then are able to look at the big picture and synergise with the (project) team as a whole then we are able to produce quite effecient results.

You see this all the time in sports where a very talented team just can’t seem to get it together. I once coached a basketball team that, individually, were quite brilliant for their age group. But as a team they just couldn’t take the ‘I’ out of team. A championship team (or for that matter a good team) is a team that is able to synergise well together – their is no ego only healthy respect for each other. BA’s working with Testers and developers in harmony to produce something extraordinary (one government department i worked for worked exactly like that and yet another didn’t because there was a wall between the testers, BA’s and developers – literally and figuratively).

One of the ways to build this teamwork is founded on trust. It drives us, it helps us, it builds confidence in each other and in others. It enhances who we are and yet at the sametime if we trust and are trusted then we are more likely to ‘build up’ then tear down. A divided house cannot stand.

As Benjamin Franklin states on the signing of the Declaration of Independence “We must all hang together, else we shall all hang seperately”